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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
.5%, and a similar story for the euro stoxx 50. in new york, trading still under way for the dow jones industrial average, and it is not doing a lot. very little change. the euro trading for $1.3323. >> the chairman of a german steel producer has admitted to making mistakes, saying his supervisory board could have done better, but those mistakes have led to some huge losses for the company. >> the executive dick -- the executive is accused of failing to stop multi-billion dollar projects that went wrong. >> shareholders and employees are pointing the finger at the supervisory board chairman. they accuse him of failing to question bad board decisions. at the general meeting, he fought back, saying he has no intention of stepping down. >> if you ask me whether as a board we could have done things better, i will honestly say yes. we trusted people for too long. we could or should have acted sooner, but we did act once we saw what was going on if we had the appropriate facts, and we acted with resolve. >> hopes for the company's future lie with the new ceo. he fired three top executives last month af
. the problem is, of course, that he has euro skeptics breathing down his neck in britain in his own party, and i think he is banking on germany and france in particular wanting very much to keep britain in the club, which, of course, they do, but i think he may be puckering too high. the german business community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting d
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
in east london, the euro cafe is serving up british toast and italian coffee, and the patrons are discussing the european question. >> we should be allowed a say at some point. >> we are definitely part of europe, and i think we will be too small outside of europe. >> but not all londoners are as pro-eu as those in the euro cafe. >> we definitely need to renegotiate our position. it certainly detracts from what we could contribute to our own economy, which is sorely needed. >> i know we can still means -- retain a relationship with our members without necessarily the party. m a cameron's position is one of a strong britain in a more relaxed european alliance, and he says that is something he will fight for. >> david heyman is making his own position very difficult. britain's fate will hinge on its european partners. -- david cameron is making his own position very difficult. if they do not agree, britain is headed toward the exit door, and this is something the prime minister does not want at all. >> cameron's speech has been troubled for months, and battle lines are already b
've been up to 89.67. euro/yen, up if you recall, 1119.34 is where we stand at the moment. euro/dollar, 11.335 55, holding on to the gains that we have seen on that particular cross rates. we have industrial production coming out in under an hour's time. that's where we trade right in and out in europe. let bring you the first update of the day from asia. li sixuan is out of singapore. >> hi. thank you, ross. asian markets mostly in the green today. and the outperformer is still china's shanghai composite hitting a seven-month high. this after security regulators said beijing can't miss the quota for investment markets. if you recall, late last week, a top official tr china's signal said growth could come in at 7.7. surpassing beijing's target of 7.5%. sen second mainland stocks finished with .64%. over 15% after profit warnings. and the market is out of action today celebrating the coming of age day. mon tar policy does have an impact on the yen today. the japanese currency soft.ed to a the 1/2 year low against the greenback. we'll see how that market reacts when it comes back online tomo
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact, the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home, cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know, britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well, angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute, britain can't work out os own special deal.
of the health of the joint european currency, the euro. and whether, in fact the european union as it has come to be known would remain with one of its largest members. prime minister david cameron earlier this week dropped a bomb that he was going to later in this parliamentary term in a couple of years put britain's continued membership in the european union to a vote. and right now the union is not very popular among british politicians. so perhaps feeling the heat at home cameron is responding this way? >> and what about the relationship with angela merkel of germany who put a tremendous amount of her own personal credibility on the line to help prop up the currency? >> well, you know britain has long brideeled-- bridled under the rules that accompany its membership in the european unionment and david cameron has been hinting that the price of staying might be negotiating a better deal for his country in some of the areas that the european union governs. >> well angela merkel and other european politicians in response have said, wait a minute britain can't work out os own special deal. the
. if these companies are going to want an ever closer union as a result of the problems created by the euro, why should britain not want to take advantage of the changing your pandemic to give britain a chance to become more competitive? the changes going to happen. we want that changed to be a direction that suits the british people. >> i can see you gesticulating. did you want to come in? >> we have become competitive within the european union. germany has given the example, we were able to become competitive. we of a higher debt ratio the most of the member states in the eurozone. higher unemployment questions. this has nothing to do with the european union, other countries have shown that you can be successful within the european union. here we would like to cooperate with britain, as germans we would like to have them in, but to change the conditions of the treaty, we would do better through legislation. >> dr. fox, you are on the record as welcoming this speech, but some will question what is your welcoming. for starters, we do not know what the renegotiated union would look like. on the one hand
long. euro/dollar, who cares about that one today? let's talk more about china. we'll head out to hong kong for in-depth analysis. intel giving investors the jitters with a disappointing forecast and a massive increase in capital spending. we'll look at those figures just after 10:20 central european time. 16 minutes later, we'll head out to bangor to talk to the ceo of wipro. >>> and the hostage crisis continues in algeria. we'll have the latest news right after the break. stay with us. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >>> welcome back to the program. a spokesman for the british foreign office says the uk government has received no words that the hostage crisis in algeria is over. most of the reports suggests dozens might have been killed during a rescue operation carried out
policy response generally to the european union, the euro project, i should say. we have the euro group separately meeting. we have this little issue of cypress. in terms of gdp, it's little. politically, though, it could be much more significant. tie this altogether for us. how important is an essential change of power in germany to these continued effort to resolve the crisis in cypress or other member states? >> i think the key issue is that germany is a big importer from spain, italy and the periphery. if the german numbers weaken, we'll see that later in a periphery. >> especially through spain. >> ultimately, this is really an economic story. the periphery are a lagging indicator of what's going on in germany. my concern is sooner or later, these peripheral equity may start to be under pressure again. what are your positions on debt? >> i think at this stage we're still comfortable with the core. the reason, there's probably another risk off take his. whatever the reason behind it, it tends to protect the periphery, not the core. for example, france continues to perform very, very
equities at a five-year high, the euro rallying so prices being lifted by this different influences. melissa: thanks for coming on. we have another truth even if it is not what you want to hear. he made it sound good even though it is bad news. lori: anybody can understand behind the price target. that is a given. it makes it a little bit easier to digest. melissa: it still does not ease how much you're paying at the pump. facebook fourth-quarter peak district of the downgrades roll in. if the company's strategy working? lori: and the drugmakers, the big pharma names. stocks getting beaten down. and competition from generic. but there is still reason to be optimistic. next. . ... melissa: time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. let's head to the floor of the new york stock exchange and our own nicole petallides. what have you got. >> i'm looking at a market here that has been somewhat mixed. nasdaq is managing to squeeze out gains the dow dropped below 13,900. some names names weighing on the dow, united health care, bank of america. market breadth actually as i look at it, a
worried about the euro, the fiscal cliff, saw it as a safe currency. with the rest of the world stabilizing everyone's looking at the u.k.'s underlying fundamentals, no growth, lack of competitiveness, banks talking about weaker sterling. sterling looks vulnerable. >> what happens with the government's finances? the ocd's come out said public spending for 2012, 49% of gdp. it was 49.6% 2011. it was supposed to go down, it went up. >> the gdp numbers were much weaker than expected. we thought there would be a decent recovery in activity. it's than public spending overshot, it's that gdp has undershot. from the ratio point of view you've ended up with a higher level of public spending. >> when you talk it weakness in sterling, what is hsbc saying -- >> against 1.8150. not a huge fall but sterling is one of the weakest of the -- generally soft currencies over the next few months. >> before you go, let's move away from the u.k. just give us your -- your general view of how 2013's going to shape out on a global economy. >> it's a great rotation in the sense that i think we'll see a d
are moving a bit lower today. forex, the euro/dollar is one to watch, up 0.1% today. 1.3330. people are talking about how the ltr payment amounts to tightening. the question then becomes for some of the weaker economies whether it's too strong. dollar/yen moving up today. the yen is weakening by about 0.1%. fitch is saying british banks could need more capital. this has certainly been a theme. something, in fact, out in davos. ross, maria and everyone has been asking banks do they play to raise more capital? ross, what do they have to say about that? >> well, look, there's a lot of folks. what was interesting is when we spoke to the barclay's ceo mr. jenkins this morning said the whole industry when they were growing revenues didn't have to worry too much about costs. now they have to focus on the cost side of the business, which we know they're going to have a transformal plan and that's what they're going to be doing, as well. . capital requirements, how much capital is right when you're still going through periods of contracting growth because, obviously, the higher capital you h
center, and, oh, yes, the pound sterling at odds with the euro. markets up more than 4% year to date. my next guest says while some investors are still on the sidelines, we're beginning to see a little bit more interest. joining us now with his outlook for the markets and the economy, of course, chief investment strategist for ubs wealth management, mike ryan. mike, good to have you here. >> good to be here. lou: a lot of fun in the european union. start there. we're not hearing so much about the collapse of the e.u., david cameron has other ideas, but the reality seems to be that things are quieting down a bit over there and not influencing our markets nearly so much. >> i think that's fair. i think what we're seeing, really, in the eurozone is an absence of mall las. the last couple years, an existential crisis, would the euro and player survive? a lot has been taken off the table by the posture of the european central bank saying we're standing behind the sovereigns. where does the growth come from? the real extreme risk event is eliminated. lou: and implied or at least indirectly bac
mechanism in order to protect the euro. now we have it. now it is in place. and that's an excellent advantage. on the other hand, for financial and fiscal solidity we have the so-called fiscal compact. this, too, is in force ever since the beginning of this year, and there's now a particular point where we have to continue working, so we have improved fiscal consolidation, we have better, binding commitments, better tools, we have better mechanisms. we also have as regards banking supervision made considerable progress as of 2014, we will have a banking supervision in place in the eurozone in which, obviously, also other european countries can participate. but we're still lacking, and that's something that we need to do this year, 2013, is to see to it that over the next few years to come we also have a convergence in competitiveness within the common euro area. so not somewhere where we are sort of, um, expecting the lowest common denominator, but competitiveness that measures wealth against the best of us and against the best on the global markets. and showing us access to global
against the euro, which is at 11-3358. and gold prices are down, $1,678.20 an ounce. >>> michael corbett says the bank has the right status to generate future growth. speaking at the world economic forum in davos, he tells cnbc that several years worth of revamping efforts are beginning to pay off. >> over the last year, we've simplified the company a lot the. we've become smaller, we've become simpler. >> corbat took over in october after the resignation of chief vickram pandit. >> very sharp in the stripes. >> yeah. >> the gegco, do we have a shot at him? >> no. >> that looks pretty good. there's product in there. what do you think, it's water? there is product. and, you know -- >> davos, they tend to walk out with wet hair and it turns to ice. >> but people don't look that good in davos, normally. >> that's true. >> he looks like a banker there. i think he has a lot of potential as far as his looks go. in the world economic forum in davos is in full swing. let's get to andrew buzzing in the mountains of switzerland. you're a big apple-phile, too. >> you're hoping people look good in d
-fledged member. using the euro and everything else. i guess it makes it less likely that they'll adopt a common currency. if they're thinking about leaving the union. >> absolutely. no, there's a widespread sense of relief that britain isn't more closely tied in. if you leak at the performance of the economy, the fact britain has its own central bank, it can pursue monetary policies or policies appropriate for britain and not have to worry about other member states certainly is being taken as a sign of relief. and there's very little sentiment certainly for joining the euro now. although i will say the bank of england numbers fight they're not happy with how strong sterling is. they think currency should be weaker and it could help performance going forward. echoing the currency that we're starting to hear this year. >> no talk about becoming the 51st state which they probably have wanted to do for a while given how we excelled after we broke off. they could come back into the fold, perhaps joining the u.s. and adopt the dollar if they really wanted some -- any talk of that at this point? would
the euro but in many aspects it is in and it is a full member. united states depends on britain for the very strong role in international affairs. it helps all over the place whether in trying to confront iran, syria and north korea with sanctions and plays a big role whether afghanistan, iraq. david cameron is saying we like our foreign role. we like you and our economic role in the e.u. but we don't want to be a part of your political role. he is trying to negotiate a half in/half out role for the u.k. that is very concerning to the u.s. because he has raised the stakes by saying he would put it to the british people in the referendum. if they vote to get out of the e.u. that could fundamentally change that relationship. >> let's listen to a little bit of your interview there. >> you see all the economic turmoil in europe. you see it over here, as well, in the u.s., the rambling over the fiscal cliff. it seems to be endless economic uncertainty. >> president obama and i have agreed that different countries should take different pathways according to circumstances and america i
of are calling not for an increase in the budget, not for a freeze in the budget, but for a 200 billion euro increase in the budget? and while they're at it, they want to get rid of the rest of the british rebate. is that his policy? >> the reality is this: he can't convince anyone on europe. last year he announced out of the december negotiations with a veto and the agreement went ahead anyway. you've thrown in the towel even before these negotiations have begun. he can't convince european leaders, he can't even convince his own back benchers. he is weak abroad, he is weak at home. it's john major all over again. >> ed miliband and david cameron. and a few hours later the commons debate on the e.u. budget began in earnest. >> now, let me take this multiannual framework -- or e.u. budget, to use a simple word -- to ask for the european union to ask for a 10% real increase above inflation is insulting to our constituents, it's ensubtling, it is insulting to the people of spain and italy ask and portugal and ireland who are being told to pull in tear belts. -- in their belts. >> isn't the trut
of the euro is not likely anymore, and that's clearly the case. i think draghi has done a terrific job. and number three getting through the leadership transition in china and further stimulation in china. all of those three things are more positive than they have been at any point in the last several years. >> in no doubt about it. in terms of europe. you have the election in italy, bonds due, interest on the bonds due in spain. do these represent hiccups do you think? >> i think they're just challenges or marks in the journey. look at what the progress has been in europe. the progress with the fiscal constraint in portugal, in ireland, in spain. the role monti has played in italy and the leadership he's given that country. the steadfastness of merkel in germany. the fiscal restraint in the uk. all of these are saying we get it collectively. we need to show restraint, but we need to restructure at a pace our societies can absorb so we're going to have a continued series of steps. there's no big bang answer. >> speaking of the u.s. for a moment, a number of banks are getting out of fix
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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